History of Blandford

Blandford has been a fording point since Somewhat English Saxon occasions, when it was recorded as Blaen-y-portage and as Blaneford in the Domesday Book. The name Blandford gets from the Early English blǣge, and presumably implies portage where gudgeon or blay are found. By the thirteenth century it had turned into a market town[citation needed] with an animals showcase serving the adjacent Blackmore Vale with its numerous dairy ranches. Toward the beginning of the fourteenth century it returned two individuals from parliament and was otherwise called Cheping Blandford. The Latin word Discussion, which means showcase, was recorded in 1540.

In Overview of Dorsetshire, composed by Thomas Gerard of Trent in the mid 1630s, Blandford was depicted as “a faire Markett Towne, pleasantlie situated upon the Stream … all around inhabitted and of good Traffique”. In the seventeenth century English Common War Blandford was a Royalist focus; most tenants upheld the lord.

In the eighteenth century Blandford was one of a few ribbon making focuses in the district; Daniel Defoe expressed that trim made in the town was “the best bonelace in Britain… I think I never observed better in Flanders, France or Italy”. In the seventeenth and eighteenth hundreds of years Blandford was additionally a malting and blending focal point of some criticalness.